Home Forums Ongoing Developments in Africa Ongoing Projects in Africa and their Importance

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    Prince Joseph
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      Have you observed how fast-paced the African continent is developing and you always wake up to remarkable structures of significance erected around the continent? This is a result of the catalyst that has always been associated with modern development.

       

      Infrastructure development has been a focus of many governments across African countries to meet the needs and requirements of a progressively growing population; thereby making construction the largest sector in the continent.

       

       

      It will interest you to know that there are over 580+ ongoing and completed construction projects in Africa worth $500+ billion. Project bothering on energy is said to be worth a whopping $380+ billion, with transportation projects which include roads, airports, and railways, worth over $300 billion.

       

       

      However, we will be taking you through some of the mind-blowing ongoing projects of reasonable significance and monuments from around Africa.

       

       

      The first to consider is the Ethiopia light-rail system which came as a bang as the Addis Metro is the first-ever light rail system. The cost of the project is around $500 million. This project serves as a significant project that contributes to the development of transportation infrastructure in and around Ethiopia and makes more locations accessible for commuters.

       

       

      Around Africa, the only other light rail systems are found in North Africa, Morocco,  Tunisia, and Algeria.

       

       

      As green energy is being encouraged and more countries are developing infrastructures toward embracing green energy, here is Morocco’s solar plant project jointly financed by the African Development Bank.

       

       

      The solar plant is estimated to cost $2.4 billion for the whole project and anticipated production of 2 Gigawatts of power generation.  Not to leave out that this project is significantly the world’s largest solar power plant on record.

       

       

      Egypt’s Suez Canal, remarkably completed in one year, and inaugurated by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is a 72-km section that speeds up traffic along the key international shipping route.

       

       

      This project aided reduced waiting time for vessels from 18 hours down to 11 hours and doubled revenue for the country.

       

       

      Guinea’s hydropower dam has an output of 240 MW and is funded partly by China. It has succeeded in tripling the electricity supply which will aid industrialization and as Guinea president Alpha said in his speech, “without electricity, Africa cannot develop; with electricity, we will industrialize and we will no longer see our children dying in the waters of the Mediterranean because they despair of Africa.”

       

       

      The Sudan agribusiness project (crop and animal-feed production project) is the first 20,000-acre phase of a joint billion-dollar agricultural project with a United Arab Emirates company.

       

       

      This massive project uses rain irrigation technology and is estimated to span 130, 000 acres of land at completion. It is located in the northern part of Sudan and is already home to the most talked-about Gezira irrigation project.

       

       

      The Puntland airport located in Somalia is a vital economic lifeline for the semi-autonomous Puntland.

       

       

      The international airport sits in the third-largest city in Somalia and now allows for large aircraft to land and take off as it is seen to significantly serve as an economic boost for the northern economy.

       

       

      President Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud termed it one of the territory’s “big achievements” in decades.

       

       

      Dangote Cement plants, though privately-owned erected multi-billion dollar cement plants in Cameroun, Ethiopia, Zambia, and Tanzania.

       

       

      It is going to scale job creation, and also as cement is the major input in construction works, would help make readily available raw materials for the further development of infrastructure across several locations around Africa.

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