Morocco set To Become Europe’s Green Energy Source

0

Morocco has made energy independence one of its main strategic axes since the early 2000s. They however have a two-fold problem; they hardly produce hydrocarbons and do not have the necessary technology for nuclear energy.

Their solution in recent years has been to resort to the sun and the wind, which are its strong points. The goal would be to reduce energy imports and substantially increase the share of renewable energy in its energy mix, with its sights set for 2030.

      

Once this is achieved, Morocco would become a major African leader in the field of renewable energy. Their success however is dependent on the capacity of the Moroccan energy network to integrate with the European one.

Morocco is now making a bid to become Europe’s primary source of green energy. Europe aims to transition to renewable energy, spurred by its efforts to end its dependence on Russian oil in the wake of that country’s invasion of Ukraine. Morocco may hold the key thanks to its abundant sunshine and relatively close proximity to Europe. Moroccan leaders see an opportunity to become a leader in the next energy revolution. “Other countries leverage the fact that they have oil. We don’t. We leverage wind and solar,” Mohamed Alaoui, managing director of Africa Climate Solutions, told the Post. “In Morocco, we see it as a huge opportunity.”

Morocco already built a grand solar facility near Ouarzazate, but experts say there is no practical reason the country can’t significantly expand its solar capabilities. Energy economist Jonathan Walters says, “There’s almost unlimited potential.”

Morocco already built a grand solar facility near Ouarzazate, but experts say there is no practical reason the country can’t significantly expand its solar capabilities. Energy economist Jonathan Walters says, “There’s almost unlimited potential.”

In addition to its abundant sunshine, Morocco benefits from its ample available land that is flat and not in use, unlike much of Europe. Morocco is already connected to Spain via undersea power cables that span the ten-mile-wide Strait of Gibraltar. “The comparative advantage is pretty straightforward as long as policies don’t discriminate against it,” said Walters.

Choose your Reaction!
Leave a Comment